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An Amish Farmer's Annual "To-Do" List

Season by Season

By Catie Noyes • Editor Published: March 1, 2013 4:00 AM
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Spring:

-Constantly care for livestock; milking dairy cows, tending to horses, feeding sheep and pigs, etc.

-Cover the strawberries in mid-March.

-Put manure on the garden and in the fields.

-Plow fields

-Turn cows out to pasture, early to mid-April

-Give the barn a good, thorough cleaning; scrape manure and put fresh bedding in stalls (this will help to eliminate flies and prevent animal diseases.)

-Sow oats and seed hay in April

-Plow the garden and work it up

Winter:

-Continue to care for livestock; milking dairy cows, tending to horses, feeding sheep and pigs, etc.

-Grind feed for the animals

-Scrape manure from barns

-If the ground is frozen and there is not too much snow, bring more firewood from the woods.

-Get farm machinery in, cleaned up and fixed up for the next planting season and store for the winter.

-Attend local weekly auctions or special auctions such as machinery and livestock auctions

-Put out bird feeders, keep them full and take record of the birds that you see

-Rest up and prepare for the spring

-Build new fences and repair the old ones; replace any necessary gates

-Go mushroom hunting in the woods

-Plant corn during the first half of May

-Cut hay, late May to late June

Summer:

- Continue to care for livestock; milking dairy cows, tending to horses, feeding sheep and pigs, etc.

-Cut barley in late June and thrash it

-Cultivate corn

-Clip pastures with a sickle-bar mower to keep the weeds from going to seed

Fall:

-Continue to care for livestock; milking dairy cows, tending to horses, feeding sheep and pigs, etc.

-Fill silos in September; cut corn with binder, tie in bundles, load on wagon and take to silo to be filled.

-Put corn in shocks in October (this corn will be for the corn crib)

-Plow and seed winter wheat in September

-Bring cows in from the summer pasture and put in the barn

-Cut, split and bring firewood in from woods (dead wood can be brought in now, fresh-cut wood needs to season for a year.

-Enjoy the fullness of an Indian Summer day.

-Cut wheat around the 4th of July

-Harvest oats in late July

-Go berry picking along fence rows, by roadsides and in the woods

-Take time to enjoy the evening "show," as the fireflies rise from the hay and oat fields and from the meadows.


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